Tag Archives: Video

The benefits of short form video

The music video has been a staple of the music industry since the early 1980’s. With the rise of MTV, we saw artists from Duran Duran to Madonna start to pay a great deal of attention to crafting elaborate, eye-catching gems, that in some cases catapulted artists to global fame in an instant. With the advent of the digital revolution came the further evolution of the music video. With content sharing platforms like YouTube and Vimeo, artists are able to have a no holds barred policy on video creation, from giving their fans mini movies that can sometimes be 20 minutes long, to little teaser videos.

However, as Quite Great has noticed, today fans are after something more intimate, something that has individuality yet doesn’t overshadow the music itself. Many big stars don’t seem to understand this, but for many indie artists out there today, they are acutely aware that fans just want something aesthetically pleasing, but nothing too over the top that devalues the power of the song. That is why short-form video is an indie artist’s best friend, and moreover it’s where they are leading the way, compared to the big music industry establishment, who are finding it hard to understand.

A double bass being played

Leading where others are failing

In her article for Midem Blog, Claire Mas writes: “Short-form video continues to grow in importance and the music industry is still struggling to effectively tap into this trend. I continue to badger artists, managers and agents to use short-form video for any announcement: whether it is an album release (with a teaser video), a tour (with an artist shouting out about it) or a music video (using a cut down 20 seconds version for socials). An interesting development in this space is that Facebook may become much more than just the largest marketing funnel, but actually a potential video destination (with their new video search platform) and source of income (the launch of their Rights Manager must mean monetisation is imminent).”

With a number of short-form video additions to the myriad social media sites and other platforms out there, now is the time for artists to take the bull by the horns and continue galvanising this tool. Marketed correctly, your presence online will explode. On specific musicians that have seen the potential in this new and exciting medium, the Icelandic rock band Sigur Ros showed everyone how it’s done. Anish Patel, writing on the storytelling aspects of short-form video, in Venture Beat, mentioned how Instagram’s new Periscope-style video feature, that allows users to view a curated collection of video clips from major events, captured the interest of the band, resulting in an innovative curated video. “Sigur Rós took advantage of this” he writes “by launching an “ever-evolving” video, which collated their fans’ Instagram photos and videos for a continually updated music video. Fans simply tag their content with a designated hashtag to join in and their content gets added to the video. This interactive concept could be duplicated by any brand with a large following, continuously updated, and then shared on Instagram with a branded hashtag.”

With such a vast variety of video making tools, that range from free to costing just a few pounds, there really has been no better time for artists to just go forth and create, becoming short-form video masters. Furthermore, with the big honchos of the music industry lagging behind, it’s time for indie artists to take the baton and launch a new movement where both artists and fans can benefit exponentially.

Images by freeimages.com/Marcel Hol & freeimages.com/Vyvyan Black

BECOMING YOUR OWN MUSIC MANAGER BY QUITE GREAT

The Quite Great Music marketing team at www.quitegreatmusicmarketinguk.com spend a great deal of time gaining insights into the world of unsigned and developing artists from across the globe , we are lucky to speak to around two or three bands and artists a day so we gain a real feel for the problems they face plus the opportunities they open for themselves through hard work and we are so pleased when they take time out and tell us in their own words about the way they develop as it is useful to all other acts in a similar position . The following information from the brilliant Japanese Fighting Fish is both eloquent and very informative and is a must read for anyone trying to manage their own music career from the bottom up.

http://www.japanesefightingfish.co.uk/

https://www.facebook.com/Japanesefightingfishuk

https://soundcloud.com/japanese-fighting-fish

https://twitter.com/jffuk

https://www.youtube.com/user/JFFish

As a self-releasing or self-managed band, the road to getting heard by a larger audience is fraught with challenges and not for the faint of heart, but with a lot of work, passion, and the right combination of band members is well worth taking on not to mention hooking up with the kind of guys at Quite Great music marketing who we are set to release our second single through. This of course assumes that the band have something truly unique to offer, however there are countless examples where the lack of originality has not prevented success, dispelling the myth that all it takes is the right song in a fleeting moment. That moment is made through perseverance and the culmination of multiple efforts at the same time, built on a foundation of a supportive lifestyle.

Firstly, the decision to even be a self-releasing band should be a conscious one, not to be taken lightly, but in an ever self-sufficient world of digital releases, the alternative is not always a viable option at entry level. It’s worth acknowledging that self-releasing comes in many different forms, and the extent to which it is executed largely depends on how well-informed the band is on the various options and how honest and realistic the members are in relation to their desired goals before setting out to achieve them.

In the early stages of a band’s development, creating a clear sense of what the band stands for will go a long way to defining how other people relate to the band going forward. Understanding each band member’s strengths and delegating duties fairly is as important at this stage as ever. Maybe one person has a good telephone manner and someone else has a flair for chatting to the local stage manager in person. Working to strengths and dividing duties evenly does wonders to nail that gig slot or land that studio time at a discount rate. Funding these efforts with a stable income is as important as time management and being organised, neither of which are attributes usually associated with aspiring musicians unfortunately. In for a penny, in for a pound.

Networking with the right studio engineers, photographers and ultimately booking agents goes a long way in bringing a relatively new band to big heights. Some bands are lucky to catch fire early owing to a combination of coolness, raw talent and luck, but it can be very damaging to expect opportunity to arrive on a silver plate. It can take a significant amount of time and research to have the right people in your circle of activity but once all the gears are moving in unison the energy of the band can be contagious to fans and influential individuals at all levels.

Decisions along the way may be tough, and it’s no secret that band members don’t decide on everything unanimously. Having the right attitude by putting the needs of the band before the preferences of the individual is important, both in writing songs and group decisions. A band agreement is highly useful in clearing up ambiguity and acts as great protection from uncertainty or misunderstanding.

Knowing where you need help and having the right tools at your disposal to seek that help out at the right cost is often half the battle. For example, using a digital distributor such as CD Baby can alleviate the pressure of deciding on the best retail strategy, allowing the band to use their limited resources elsewhere to promote their release. Again, promotion is something a band will need help with sooner or later, and knowing when and how the realm of the band meets the realm of the people working with the band will allow things to work in unison.

In an ideal world the right people will approach the band and offer great services at little or no cost and everyone is a winner. The reality is that this may happen perhaps in one or two realms to varying degrees of risk which is why access to the facts from the outset can mitigate time and money wasted.

There are now more than ever a whole host of things that bands can take on themselves with a myriad of online resources and pro tips. Entrusting the right people both inside and outside the band with the right tasks is a prerequisite for success, but ultimately getting out there and getting people excited about what you do is the best way to strike up a working partnership that can bear fruit in ways that are often hard to predict.

Matt // JFF

http://www.japanesefightingfish.co.uk/

https://www.facebook.com/Japanesefightingfishuk

https://soundcloud.com/japanese-fighting-fish

https://twitter.com/jffuk

https://www.youtube.com/user/JFFish

How to construct a great music video

Create a unique music video to stand out from the crowd!

When you’re creating a music video, you want it to be captivating, memorable and show off the song perfectly. While anyone can put together a music video, it takes a little more thought and effort to make it truly exceptional. After reading this article, you’ll be able to construct a music video that will really excite your audience! Continue reading How to construct a great music video

Cheap PR Campaign for Unsigned Bands

Do they exist ?? Because we offer an integrated release system encompassing radio, online , print etc., Quite Great gets approached by around three bands a day looking to release music in the UK. It is really important when deciding on how to release your music that a band or an artist does understand that the recording of the music – whether using a friend to produce or a world renowned producer – will still mean someone has to promote your music. So what do you do? Why not Google ‘cheap music promotion’ or the ‘cheap music pr’ option? Generally that means paying £250 to £400 for someone to use their well structured mail chimp or similar mailing list, then filling in the dots similar to taking a survey, but does this get you anywhere?

Often we are told that companies offer a three month period for this but most of the time what looks like something that is too good to be true is too good to be true! At Quite Great we edit many blogs and websites, helping to create the news and giving us a platform to build a real structure for future releases. We are sent many releases aiming primarily it seems to make sure a video link is clicked, so if nothing else more views may be registered on a band’s YouTube. But this is not a way to build profile. This is a way to show a band or an artist that something has been done whilst making them feel they are being promoted.

In order to run an efficient PR company you need to staff it a coordinated release and not continually outsource, so being thrifty and thinking that promotion for under £400 is what you need may not always be the best way forward. Always compare services like for like. Make sure if you are trying to find a company that offers all the services you need to release your music, then you are actually getting this. But be prepared to spend more money and make the most of the bigger team and acting as your own label boss. That is why we created the DIY label service via www.quitegreatmusicmarketinguk.com to give artists independence and control they deserve.

So once you have found a company and understand if your band is going to be given a rounded promotional campaign featuring online, press and radio you need to make sure you have a good relationship with the team who you are working with. We have at least ten Skype meetings a week, along with providing weekly updates so everyone knows what is going on. We discuss the positives and the negatives and work around them to build the foundations for a career which ultimately is what your band or you as an artist really needs.

PR Campaigns for Unsigned musicians